Fady, who has Parkinson's Disease, with his daughter Cynthia and wife Mangala
14 January 2019
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For 54 year-old Victorian man, Fady, being the first patient in a Victorian hospital to experience a new technique for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) has been life changing.

Fady was diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease in 2008 and the symptoms of the condition forced Fady to close the family business because his shaking was so severe.

“I felt like nothing. I couldn't do anything, I just stayed home,” Fady said.

“For me it was a big thing. People would say put your hands in your pockets – but it wasn’t easy.”

Neurosurgeon, Mr Girish Nair, using a new technique for Deep Brain Stimulation to help Parkinson's Disease sufferers
RMH Neurosurgeon, Mr Girish Nair, using a new technique for Deep Brain Stimulation to help Parkinson's Disease sufferers

Royal Melbourne Hospital Neurosurgeon, Mr Girish Nair, said the new technique using a frameless custom implant that was 3D printed and fixed onto the patient’s scull, made the placing of the electrodes for DBS a lot easier.

“This new technique makes the operation a lot easier and more comfortable for the patient as they can be asleep during the whole procedure,” Mr Nair said.

“Traditional DBS is an uncomfortable procedure for the patient as they must be awake and have a large metal frame surround the scull.

“By using a frameless device on the skull, we can insert the wires into the porcelain tubes and then transfer the patient straight to the MRI - it’s seamless.

“Deep Brain Stimulation helps improve the symptoms of tremors, difficulty walking and stiffness in people with Parkinson's Disease.”

Once the electrodes were switched on by his Neurologist, Dr Andrew Evans, a few days later the shaking stopped immediately.

Fady said he was really excited by his new future.

“I can now go back to life, not shy or shaking anymore.”

Fady’s wife, Mangala, said she was very grateful to the staff at the RMH.

“I get my husband back. He wasn’t himself at home but slowly and slowly we’ll get there,” she said.

“You don’t have to give up. There is always hope.”

Main photo: Patient Fady is pictured with his daughter Cynthia and wife Mangala, after being the first patient in a Victorian hospital to experience a new technique for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's Disease.

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