News


11 July 2022

After 17 months 73-year-old resident Beverly and 35-year-old volunteer Melissa have finally had a chance to meet face to face.

Aboriginal Hospital Liaison Officer Lani and Nina from EARTHwise
08 July 2022
The Royal Melbourne Hospital's Aboriginal Health Unit were busy putting on a spectacular show of culture, history and celebration for NAIDOC Week.
06 July 2022

The randomised multicentre trial found patients who were given a combination FDG-PET/CT scan instead of a conventional CT scan were able to be given more targeted treatments.

Photograph of Medical Support Officers
29 June 2022

If you’ve been down to the triage and ambulatory care part of our emergency department recently, you might have bumped into one of our Medical Support Officers (MSOs).

21 June 2022

When it comes to choosing N95 respirator masks, healthcare workers at the Royal Melbourne Hospital (RMH) have voted the three-panel flat-fold N95 mask the most comfortable.

RMH WEHI
21 June 2022

The Royal Melbourne Hospital’s (RMH) Associate Professor Cherie Chiang and WEHI's Associate Professor Andrew Webb are developing an early diagnosis test for dementia at the Colonial Foundation Healthy Ageing Centre.

The Royal Melbourne Hospital's 2022 Dry July Ambassador Natasha is pictured in the centre with some of the nurses from the hospital's Haematology and Bone Marrow ward in the garden on 7B.
16 June 2022

Natasha received the shock of a lifetime when what she believed to be long-COVID was diagnosed as leukemia. Now she is showing her support for the RMH as its Dry July Ambassador for 2022.

The RMH Professor Alistair Royse
09 June 2022

The Royal Melbourne Hospital's Professor Alistair Royse has been awarded the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons' 2022 Sir Louis Barnett Medal.

08 June 2022

Colorectal, general and trauma surgeon at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, Doctor Tim Chittleborough has been recognised as one of nine clinicians joining the MacHSR Future Leaders Fellowship program.

03 June 2022

A large international study has found that the severity of multiple sclerosis (MS) can vary depending on latitude, with those living furthest from the equator worse affected by the disease.