Cancer

The ColoSTAT® test is being developed to provide an alternative option for people to undergo a colorectal cancer (CRC) screening test but for clinical, personal or cultural reasons, are unwilling or unable to use a stool test or are reluctant to undergo more invasive and costly procedures such as colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy.

ColoSTAT® involves the collection of a blood sample, rather than stool, to assess the presence of components in the blood which, when assessed using a specifically designed algorithm, provide a CRC risk score. The algorithm uses the results from the blood test and incorporates other CRC risk factors, such as family history and lifestyle factors to determine this risk rating.

Trial phase 

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Non-Drug
Phase 1
Phase 2
Phase 3
Phase 4
Hepatitis

The purpose of this study is to assess a novel blood collection device, called a Plasma Separation Device (PSD), which has been developed at the Burnet Institute in Melbourne. The PSD is designed to collect and store blood samples in remote and resource-poor settings and to assist with infectious diseases testing. The study team want to measure the effectiveness of the PSD for the diagnosis of Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and HIV. They also want to see if the PSD can detect other immune responses to infectious diseases that you have been vaccinated against (e.g. measles or tetanus).

Trial phase 

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Non-Drug
Phase 1
Phase 2
Phase 3
Phase 4
Cancer - Breast

The purpose of this research is to find out whether the study medication denosumab can help prevent breast cancer in women with a BRCA1 mutation. The research also aims to find out whether denosumab decreases the risk of developing ovarian cancer or other types of cancer, study the safety of using denosumab, and study its effect on bone health.

The study is a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. This means that participants will receive an injection of either denosumab or placebo (no drug) every 6 months for 5 years. Participants will need to visit their study doctor every 6 months while receiving the medication and will continue to be checked by their study team every 12 months for a further 5 years (total of 10 years).

Trial phase 

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Non-Drug
Phase 1
Phase 2
Phase 3
Phase 4
Cancer - Brain

Patients diagnosed with glioblastoma are treated with a combination of chemotherapy and radiation, followed by six months of temozolomide (chemotherapy). However, even with the best treatment, the average survival is around 14 months. Previous research has suggested that an extra six months of temozolomide may improve survival without any impact on quality of life or symptoms related to treatment. However, these studies were small and unable to provide a definitive answer. In some centres, it is standard to use six months of chemotherapy, whilst in others, the standard is 12 months.

The purpose of this study is to determine if an additional six months of temozolomide will improve the survival of patients with glioblastoma. We will also assess whether an additional six months of temozolomide causes more side effects.

Patients who decide to participate in the trial will be randomly assigned to either receive an additional six months of temozolomide chemotherapy or not and continue with their usual care.

Trial phase 

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Non-Drug
Phase 1
Phase 2
Phase 3
Phase 4
Dermatological Conditions

Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria (CSU) is defined as the spontaneous occurrence of itchy wheals (hives), swelling of the skin, or both lasting for at least 6 weeks. This study is testing a new treatment for CSU called ligelizumab. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of ligelizumab in treating patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria.

Trial phase 

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Non-Drug
Phase 1
Phase 2
Phase 3
Phase 4
Dermatological Conditions

Atopic dermatitis, often known as eczema, is a chronic, inflammatory skin disorder characterized by flaky skin lesions, intense itch, and a general deterioration in quality of life.

This research study is evaluating a new study drug called Nemolizumab, given regularly as an injection under the skin, in patients with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis not adequately controlled with topic corticosteroids. The purpose of this study is to assess the safety and efficacy of Nemolizumab compared to placebo.

The study drug is not currently approved for use in Australia. The duration of the study is 48 weeks with the opportunity to enrol in the long term extension study.

Trial phase 

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Non-Drug
Phase 1
Phase 2
Phase 3
Phase 4
Dermatological Conditions

Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is a rare, autoimmune skin condition characterised by blistering and itch. Many patients who have BP require treatment with topical steroids whilst others may require tablets, injections or infusions.

The investigational drug is dupilumab and is administered by injection.

The purpose of this research project is to measure how safe and effective dupilumab is in treating participants with BP who are off oral corticosteroids. Prior research studies in humans have shown that dupilumab may help control the immune system that is responsible for the signs and symptoms of BP and help achieve disease improvement.

Trial phase 

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Non-Drug
Phase 1
Phase 2
Phase 3
Phase 4
Depression

SKY-D is investigating whether ketamine is an effective treatment for young people with depression.

We are inviting young people aged 16 to 25 years, with moderate-to-severe depression, to take part in this research. Participants will divided into two groups. One group will receive a low dose of ketamine once a week for four weeks. The other group will receive a low dose of another medication, called midazolam, once a week for four weeks.

We hope that the results of this study will help us to provide the best possible care in the future for young people with depression.

Trial phase 

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Non-Drug
Phase 1
Phase 2
Phase 3
Phase 4